Search

Q & A

Questions From The Community

Field studies in Turkey Creek (Palm Bay) in 2017 and at Lake Toho, near Kissimmee, in 2004 both show that removal of muck is associated with reductions in nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) entering the water. These nutrients are major causes of the poor condition of the Indian River Lagoon. Removing all the muck down to the sand bottom creates areas that have little muck available to release nutrients, so the nutrient flux from these cleaned areas drops significantly and allows sea grasses to take root and grow. These studies also reported an increase in plant and animal populations after the muck’s removal.  
  • Sources: University of Florida, IFAS Sea Grant, Water Resources

Lagoon Questions and Answers